Neil Hamburger

The Bread Shed, Manchester.

Neil Hamburger

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This event is for over 18s only - No refunds will be issued for under 18s.

Ticket type Cost (face value)? Quantity
GENERAL ADMISSION £16.50 (£15.00) Transaction fee applicable *

* The transaction fee is £0.00 for E-ticket (Print-at-home), £0.00 for Box Office Collection, £2.50 for Standard Delivery or £6.50 for Secure Post.

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More information about Neil Hamburger tickets

America’s Funnyman Neil Hamburger is the hardest working comedian in existence, performing up to 399 shows a year internationally to critical acclaim and audience bewilderment. He has toured as the hand-picked opener for Tenacious D, Tim & Eric, and Faith No More, appeared on TV shows ranging from Tim and Eric Awesome Show Great Job! to Jimmy Kimmel Live!, and worked extensively with Tom Green on his internet talk show. Among his dozen or so albums and DVDs is the new LP release Hot February Night.


“A phlegm-filled sack of putrid self-loathing, Neil Hamburger is the perfect satire of a slick, professional nightclub comedian. If you’ve ever suspected that behind the glossy veneer of fake bonhomie of those perma-smile acts lies an ugly, embittered, grotesque soul — well Hamburger is that demon made flesh. In some living Sisyphean hell, every night he dons his tuxedo, greases down his hair and ploughs through the vile set that disgusts even him, just so he can earn a threepiece chicken dinner. His contempt for his own pitiful existence is surpassed only for his contempt for the audience who compel him trudge through his despicable cavalcade of jokes. And my, these gags are certainly not for the faint of heart, as he plumbs the depths of depravity for the sake of a laugh.” — Chortle (UK)


“Hamburger is the clapped-out husk of a decorous Southern gentleman, now coughing in painful hacks, suppurating filth through his tuxedo, and here to tip a slurry of abuse all over celebrity and modern life…a combination of malignance and desiccated vaudeville.” — The Guardian (UK)